Dating someone with a mental illness

When you date a man with depression, it can become a struggle to maintain a relationship with him and protect your own mental health. The experience is not fundamentally different than dating someone without a mental illness, but there are issues that are more likely to arise. By understanding these issues and knowing how to respond, you can support the man you love without threatening the relationship or your emotional wellbeing. We discuss the following insights in the context of dating men, but they apply equally to women. Scroll further down to read about behaviors and situations you are more likely to encounter with men only. Also realize you are not guaranteed to encounter these issues when you date someone with depression.

Advice for Dating Someone with a Mental Illness

I was married for nine years to someone struggling with depression and social anxiety. At first this seemed like a good fit. After all, I had spent most of my life managing my own depression, anxiety and anorexia. Finding a partner who understood the challenges of mental illness seemed like a dream come true. I could empathize with his condition. He seemed compassionate about mine.

And I loved him unconditionally — mostly. The truth is: If I seem like a hypocrite, I get it. And I know I need a partner who understands that dark side of me. Anyone else who has dated someone with mental illness including all my past partners knows this to be true. What I have learned is that when you put two mentally ill people together, there can often be as much challenge as there is compassion and love. Oh, it can be so tempting. We have so many tools to share from our own survival arsenal.

We have so many insights and pep talks and encouraging words we want to say. My recommendation: He or she is the only one who can solve them, and they need to do it on their own. Yes, be a solid presence. Yes, love on them without end. But no — do not take their problems on as your problems, or soon you will be drowning alongside them. This is a tough one. When I met my current partner, I knew he was stressed and low. I wanted to arrange everything — introduce him to everything — fix everything for him.

It fed into my own issues of self-worth and wanting to be needed by someone else. The only problem: My lesson: I need to step back and let him take care of himself. Two people with illogical thoughts can come to many unhealthy and illogical conclusions. Consider joining a group like Celebrate Recovery or find a compassionate listening program like Humble Warrior to get an outside perspective on your inside problems.

Whereas I was a chatty pisces needing to bear my soul every five minutes, my husband was not a talker. He tended to shut down instead of facing issues head on. Please know this: But mental illness makes it even more important. Both partners need to feel fulfilled and valued. If one person is constantly melting down, forcing the other to be strong and stable, it will probably never work.

And check in often to make sure you are succeeding in those efforts. Find a friend who is not your partner to keep you accountable for sticking to them. Building a successful relationship with someone with mental illness is not impossible. But when both people struggle with mental illness, it can take a lot of work and commitment. Both partners need to give what they can to help their partners stay healthy. But both also need to be able to receive what they need to stay stable.

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Dating someone with a mental illness raises certain complications, as would dating someone with any other illness. Learn what to do and not to. A woman makes a list of five pieces of advice she would give to someone who struggles with mental illness who is dating someone who is also.

If you are dating a girl with a mental illness, toss your preconceived notions aside and try to see the world from our point of view. Here are 17 things you should know about dating a girl with mental illness. Why are women with a mental illness self-conscious? Society puts a ridiculous amount of pressure on women to be flawless in every area, including our mind. Mental Illness is part of her, but it does not define her, and if her condition prevents you from seeing her as an individual first, then it is best to leave her be.

Dating is hard enough as it is.

With regards to romantic relationships, mental health should be discussed before things get serious. If you are worried about saying the wrong thing or hurting your partner, this is normal. Our experts at Banyan Mental Health explain tips for dating someone with a mental illness and offer mental health treatment.

Should You Date Someone With a Mental Illness?

This is something that we should definitely be talking about. For one thing, it is very likely that you will at least go on a date with someone who is suffering or has suffered from mental health problems. Here are some things to think about when it comes to getting into a relationship with someone with depression , anxiety , PTSD , ADHD or similar mental health conditions:. As mentioned above, it is likely that you have already encountered someone with mental health problems in your dating life. In order for maintain a line of open communication, your partner needs to know that you are okay talking about his mental health without judgment or assumption. One good thing that you can do is have a weekly check-in with your partner.

Tips on Dating Someone with a Mental Illness

There are several different challenges when it comes to dating while mentally ill. The big one, though, is the disclosure problem: Is there a set timeline? A social point after which it's a faux pas? An etiquette guide? That'd be very useful, actually: It turns out that the expert answers tend to vary by particular case and by severity of disorder; there are general guidelines, but overall, the specific timing is up to you. And remember that it's normal to feel a bit of trepidation; the mental health discrimination organization Time To Change has found that a whopping 75 percent of people with mental disorders felt scared to tell new partners about it. The caution is understandable. Myths about mental disorders , romantic and otherwise, abound; people who introduce the fact of their diagnosis fear rejection by somebody cute, or being pegged as "crazy" and "undateable".

When did you know you were dating someone with a mental illness? It may have started like this:

There are millions of people in the U. About 1 in 5 adults experience some form of mental illness in a year, and 1 in 25 experience a "serious" mental illness that limits "major life activities," according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

‘So, you know I have bipolar?’ – the perils of dating with a mental health problem

If you are currently dating someone with bipolar disorder , you may struggle with a number of challenges like how you can support him or her while still caring for yourself. Knowledge is power, so learn as much as you can about your partner's disease. This will also be a healthy sign to him or her that you care. That being said, bipolar disorder is a complex disease, so try not to get too bogged down in the details. It is important when you are dating someone with bipolar disorder to recognize that their disease is a piece of their life pie, and not their whole identity. That being said, to a large degree, a person's bipolar disorder contributes significantly to their behavior, personality, and relationships. With that, you do have to learn to love the whole package, so to speak. Whether or not you are dating someone with bipolar disorder, it's important to discuss major topics, when you are both ready. For instance, if you really want children, but the person you are dating does not, this may be a deal breaker. If not, it's unlikely he or she is ready to be part of a committed relationship.

Personal Stories

Mental illness is a serious concern. According to recent statistics, about 1 out of 5 American adults suffer from mental illness in a given year. More concerning still, all Canadians will be indirectly affected by mental illness at some point in their lives, whether through contact with a friend, family member, or coworker. You have to be vigilant at all times, careful not to trigger a relapse or a fit of illness. Mental illness will try your patience at times. Many people in relationships with a sufferer of mental illness would choose differently if they had known what they were signing up for.

21 People Get Real About Dating With Anxiety & Depression

Here are a few quick insights from us, a husband and wife who have navigated these rough waters together for several years. Embrace empathy and validation. And yet when it comes to matters of the brain, we have adopted the sentiment that grit will get us through—despite our national suicide rate being higher than our homicide rate. What do we do when we see someone having an asthma attack? We act fast, we supply them with medication when needed, we give them adequate time and treatment and room to breathe, and we teach them the skills to properly take care of themselves and their affliction. Mental illnesses are scientific, physiological illnesses and need to be treated as such in order for wellness to be achieved.

Personal Stories

Dating is hard enough as it is. What about his or her mental health history? Still, here are a few suggestions for how to try to make it work with a significant other who is struggling, or how to let them go. It is just another part of his or her identity. It is another layer that you must now decide whether or not you can not only tolerate, but accept and live with. Buckle your seat belt. Some days will be effortless, and others may be draining. That really depends on the nature of the condition as well as its severity.

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Dating during your twenties is an experience in itself, but when you live with a severely stigmatized condition like bipolar disorder, dating can really be a challenge. As a year-old mental health advocate who is publicly open about her life with bipolar II disorder, I have often experienced stigma in my dating life. Bipolar disorder is a part of me, and I am not ashamed of my condition, in fact, it is the opposite, I embrace it. However, dating—when you live with a mental health condition—can be complicated: When should you tell your date about your diagnosis? Should you even tell them at all?

The survey reflects findings from a unique social experiment [3] conducted by Time to Change which disturbingly shows that people with mental health problems face significant stigma and discrimination when trying to find love or share a flat. The social experiment involved seven people with mental illnesses posting ads on dating and flatshare websites in two phases. At first the ads appeared without mention of their mental health problem, but after some weeks these were taken down and replaced with the exact same profile but this time with a line disclosing they had a mental illness. For one participant, Erik Baurdoux, who is the face of the new Time to Change campaign and stars in an online film about his experiences in the social experiment called Don't Get Me Wrong, the results were more shocking. Erik said: The amount of people who didn't respond after my mental health problem was disclosed was very high, and I found this sad and disappointing.

5 Do's and Dont's of Dealing with Other's Mental Illness
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